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csvtools v1.24 : A LaTeX2e Package Providing Access to Data Saved in a CSV File

csvtools v1.24 : A LaTeX2e Package Providing Access to Data Saved in a CSV File

Nicola Talbot

26th June 2007


Contents

List of Examples

  1. Mail Merging
  2. Multiple Figures
  3. Mail Merging using \field
  4. Aligning Data from a CSV file
  5. Adding Lines
  6. Added Complexity
  7. Using a longtable environment
  8. Stripy Table
  9. More Mail Merging
  10. Labelling within \applyCSVfile
  11. Labelling within \applyCSVfile
  12. Labelling within \CSVtotabular
  13. Labelling within \CSVtotabular
  14. Saving Entries
  15. A Pie Chart
  16. csvtools.pl -- Aligning Data

Introduction

The csvtools package allows you to repeatedly perform a set of LaTeX commands on data in each row of a comma separated variable (CSV) file. This can be used for mail merging, generating tables etc.

As from version 1.2, you can specify a different separator. To change the separator, use the command:

\setcsvseparator{separator}

For example, if your data is separated by colons instead of commas, do:

\setcsvseparator{:}
If your separator occurs within an entry, the entry must be enclosed in double quotes, for example:
Name,Address,Telephone
A.N. Other,"1 The Street,The Town",0123456789
Be careful of TEX special characters occuring within a CSV file, for example:
Name,Address,Telephone
Jack \& Jill,"2 The Street,The Town",0123456789

Mail Merging and Similar Applications

\applyCSVfile[n]{filename}{text}
\applyCSVfile*[n]{filename}{text}

Letters can be generated using data given in each line from filename. If the CSV file contains a header row, the unstarred version of \applyCSVfile should be used, otherwise the starred version \applyCSVfile* should be used. The optional argument n specifies on which line the actual data (not header line) starts. The unstarred version defaults to line 2 (the header row is always assumed to be on line 1) and the starred version defaults to 1.

With the unstarred version, the entries in the header row are used to generate commands of the form \insertidentifier1 to access corresponding elements in the row currently being processed. For example, suppose the first line of the CSV file looks like:

Name,Address,Time,Date
then the commands \insertName, \insertAddress, \insertTime and \insertDate are created, allowing you to use the entries in the first, second, third and fourth columns of the current row. If the header text contains non-alphabetical characters, e.g. Full Name, then you will need to use \insertbyname{text}, e.g. \insertbyname{Full Name}.

Alternatively, you can use the \field{col} command, where col is the column number of the entry, so \field{1} indicates the first entry in the current row and \field{2} indicates the second entry in the current row.

Example 1 (Mail Merging)

Suppose there is a file called details.csv that has the following contents:
Name,Address,Time,Date
Miss A. Person,1 The Road\\The Town\\AB1 2XY,15.00,4th May 2004
Mr A. N. Other,2 The Road\\The Town\\AB1 2XY,15.30,11th May 2004
then the following code can be used to generate a letter for each person in the CSV file2:
\applyCSVfile{details.csv}{%
\begin{letter}{\insertName\\\insertAddress}
\opening{Dear \insertName}

You are invited to an interview at \insertTime\ on the \insertDate.

\closing{Yours Sincerely}
\end{letter}}
Note that you could also use \insertbyname{Name} etc instead of \insertName etc. Also note that you need to specify the file extension when specifying the filename.

Example 2 (Multiple Figures)

Suppose sample3.csv looks like:
File,Caption
circle.ps,A Circle
rectangle.ps,A Rectangle
triangle.ps,A Triangle
Assuming that the files circle.ps, rectangle.ps and triangle.ps exist, then the following code will generate a figure for each graphics file3:
\applyCSVfile{sample3.csv}{
\begin{figure}
\centerline{\includegraphics{\insertFile}}
\caption{\insertCaption}
\end{figure}}
Note that in this example, you can't use \insertbyname{File}. (See Note 3 in Section 11.)

Example 3 (Mail Merging using \field)

Suppose there is a file called details.csv that has the following contents:
Miss A. Person,1 The Road\\The Town\\AB1 2XY,15.00,4th May 2004
Mr A. N. Other,2 The Road\\The Town\\AB1 2XY,15.30,11th May 2004
In this case the data has no header file, so the starred version of \applyCSVfile must be used. Since there is no header file, you must use \field to access the entries:
\applyCSVfile*{details.csv}{%
\begin{letter}{\field{1}\\\field{2}}
\opening{Dear \field{1}}

You are invited to an interview at \field{3}\ on the \field{4}.

\closing{Yours Sincerely}
\end{letter}}

Converting data in a CSV file into a tabular environment

\CSVtotabular{filename}{col-align}{first}{middle}{last}

filename is the name of the CSV file which must have a header row on line 1, col-align is the column alignment argument that gets passed to the tabular environment, first is the code for the first line, middle is the code for the middle lines and last is the code for the last line. This is best demonstrated with an example.

Example 4 (Aligning Data from a CSV file)

Suppose the file sample.csv looks like:
Name,Assignment 1,Assignment 2,Total
A. Smith,80,70,150
B. Jones,60,80,140
J. Doe,85,75,160
,75,75,150
then the following code can be used to align the data:
\CSVtotabular{sample.csv}{lccc}{%
\bfseries Name &
\bfseries Assignment 1&
\bfseries Assignment 2&
\bfseries Total\\}{%
\insertName &
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal\\}{%
 &
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal}
The result of this code is shown in Table 14.



Table 1: Example 4
Name Assignment 1 Assignment 2 Total
A. Smith 80 70 150
B. Jones 60 80 140
J. Doe 85 75 160
  75 75 150



\ifnextrowlast{last-code}{not-last-code}

The command \ifnextrowlast can be used to vary what happens on the last but one row. The following example illustrates this by placing \hline\hline after the penultimate row.

Example 5 (Adding Lines)

\CSVtotabular{sample.csv}{|l|ccc|}{%
\hline\bfseries Name &
\bfseries Assignment 1&
\bfseries Assignment 2&
\bfseries Total\\\hline\hline}{%
\insertName &
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal
\ifnextrowlast{\\\hline\hline}{\\}}{%
 &
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal\\\hline}
See the PDF version (csvtools.pdf) of this documentation for an illustration of the results.

Example 6 (Added Complexity)

In this example, \multicolumn is used to override the column specifier for the first column in the last row.
\CSVtotabular{sample2.csv}{|l|ccc|}{%
\hline\bfseries Name & 
\bfseries Assignment 1 & 
\bfseries Assignment 2 & 
\bfseries Total\\\hline\hline
}{%
\insertName & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} & 
\insertTotal
\ifnextrowlast{\\\hline\multicolumn{1}{l|}{}}{\\}
}{%
 & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} & 
\insertTotal\\\cline{2-4}
}
Notice that instead of placing \multicolumn{1}{l|}{} at the start of the final argument, it is instead placed in the first argument to \ifnextrowlast5. See the PDF version (csvtools.pdf) of this manual for an illustration of the results.

Converting CSV file into longtable environment

The command \CSVtolongtable works in the same way as \CSVtotabular but creates a longtable environment instead of a tabular environment.

Example 7 (Using a longtable environment)

Suppose the CSV file in the previous example, contains, say, 100 entries. This will no longer fit onto one page, so it would be better to use CSVtolongtable instead. For example:
\CSVtolongtable{sample.csv}{|l|ccc|}{%
\caption{Student Marks}\label{tab:students}\\
\hline
\bfseries Name &
\bfseries Assignment 1 &
\bfseries Assignment 2 &
\bfseries Total\\\hline
\endfirsthead
\caption[]{Student Marks}\\
\hline
\bfseries Name &
\bfseries Assignment 1 &
\bfseries Assignment 2 &
\bfseries Total\\\hline
\endhead
\hline
\multicolumn{3}{r}{\em Continued on next page}
\endfoot
\hline
\endlastfoot}{%
\insertName &
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal
\ifnextrowlast{\\\hline\hline}{\\}}{%
 & \insertbyname{Assignment 1} &
 \insertbyname{Assignment 2} &
\insertTotal\\}

Associated Counters

Within the \CSVtotabular, \CSVtolongtable and \applyCSVfile commands, there are two counters, csvlinenum and csvrownumber. The former, csvlinenum, is the current line number in the CSV file, whereas the latter, csvrownumber, is the current data row. Of the two counters, csvrownumber is likely to be the most useful.

Example 8 (Stripy Table)

David Carlisle's colortbl package defines the command \rowcolor which enables you to specify the row colour. Suppose you want a stripy table6, this can be achieved as follows:
\CSVtotabular{sample2.csv}{lccc}{%
\rowcolor{green}\bfseries Name & 
\bfseries Assignment 1 & 
\bfseries Assignment 2 & 
\bfseries Total\\\rowcolor{blue}
}{%
\insertName & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} & 
\insertTotal
\ifthenelse{\isodd{\value{csvrownumber}}}{%
\\\rowcolor{green}}{\\\rowcolor{blue}}
}{%
 & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 1} & 
\insertbyname{Assignment 2} & 
\insertTotal
}
See the PDF version (csvtools.pdf) for an illustration of the resulting table.

Example 9 (More Mail Merging)

This is an example of mail merging where the letter reference is generated from the value of csvrownumber. The CSV file is as used in Example 1.
\applyCSVfile{details.csv}{%
\begin{letter}{\insertName\\\insertAddress}
\opening{Dear \insertName}

\textbf{Ref : } interview.\thecsvrownumber

You are invited to an interview at \insertTime\ on the \insertDate.

\closing{Yours Sincerely}
\end{letter}}

Cross-Referencing

Labels can be generated using the standard \label command, but you will need some way to make each label unique. Example 10 does this by using \thecsvrownumber, whereas Example 11 uses \insertidentifier.

Example 10 (Labelling within \applyCSVfile)

Example 2 can be modified to label each figure:
\applyCSVfile{sample3.csv}{
\begin{figure}
\centerline{\includegraphics{\insertFile}}
\caption{\insertCaption}
\label{fig:pic\thecsvrownumber}
\end{figure}}
This example uses \label{fig:pic\thecsvrownumber}, so the first figure generated by this \applyCSVfile command will have the label fig:pic1, the second fig:pic2 etc.

Example 11 (Labelling within \applyCSVfile)

Modifying the previous example, we now have:
\applyCSVfile{sample3.csv}{
\begin{figure}
\centerline{\includegraphics{\insertFile}}
\caption{\insertCaption}
\label{fig:\insertFile}
\end{figure}}
The labels for each figure are now: fig:circle.ps, fig:rectangle.ps and fig:triangle.ps, respectively.

Example 12 (Labelling within \CSVtotabular)

This example is slightly more complicated. The CSV file, data.csv looks like:
Incubation Temperature,Incubation Time,Time to Growth
40,120,40
40,90,60
35,180,20
The following code generates a table using the data with an additional column that generates the experiment number. (See note 8.)
\begin{table}
\caption{Time to Growth Experiments}
\label{tab:exp}
\vspace{10pt}
\centering
\CSVtotabular{data.csv}{cccc}{%
 % Header Row
\bfseries Experiment &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Incubation\\Temperature\end{tabular} &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Incubation\\Time\end{tabular} &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Time\\to\\Growth\end{tabular}\\}{%
 % Middle Rows
\label{exp:\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}:\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}
\thecsvrownumber &
\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature} &
\insertbyname{Incubation Time} &
\insertbyname{Time to Growth} \\}{%
 % Final Row
\label{exp:\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}:\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}
\thecsvrownumber &
\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature} &
\insertbyname{Incubation Time} &
\insertbyname{Time to Growth}}
\par
\end{table}

It can be seen from Table~\ref{tab:exp}, that 
Experiment~\ref{exp:35:180} had the shortest time to growth.
In this example, each experiment has the corresponding label exp:Incubation Temperature:Incubation Time so the first experiment has label exp:40:120, the second experiment has the label exp:40:90 and the third experiment has the label exp:35:180.

Table 2 shows the resulting table for this example.



Table 2: Time to Growth Experiments
Experiment
Incubation
Temperature
Incubation
Time
Time
to
Growth
1 40 120 40
2 40 90 60
3 35 180 20


The following example is more refined in that it takes advantage of the fact that the time to growth data consists of integers only, so the experiment with the maximum growth can be determined by LaTeX.

Example 13 (Labelling within \CSVtotabular)

\newcounter{maxgrowth}
\newcounter{incT} % incubation temperature
\newcounter{inct} % incubation time

\begin{table}
\caption{Time to Growth Experiments}
\label{tab:exp}
\vspace{10pt}
\centering
\CSVtotabular{data.csv}{cccc}{%
 % Header row
\bfseries Experiment &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Incubation\\Temperature\end{tabular} &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Incubation\\Time\end{tabular} &
\bfseries \begin{tabular}{c}Time\\to\\Growth\end{tabular}\\}{%
 % Middle rows
\label{exp:\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}:\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}
\thecsvrownumber &
\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature} &
\insertbyname{Incubation Time} &
\insertbyname{Time to Growth}%
\ifthenelse{\value{maxgrowth}<\insertbyname{Time to Growth}}{%
\setcounter{maxgrowth}{\insertbyname{Time to Growth}}%
\setcounter{incT}{\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}}%
\setcounter{inct}{\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}}{}%
\\}{%
 % Last row
\label{exp:\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}:\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}
\thecsvrownumber &
\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature} &
\insertbyname{Incubation Time} &
\insertbyname{Time to Growth}%
\ifthenelse{\value{maxgrowth}<\insertbyname{Time to Growth}}{%
\setcounter{maxgrowth}{\insertbyname{Time to Growth}}%
\setcounter{incT}{\insertbyname{Incubation Temperature}}%
\setcounter{inct}{\insertbyname{Incubation Time}}}{}%
}
\par
\end{table}

As can be seen from Table~\ref{tab:exp}, 
Experiment~\ref{exp:\theincT:\theinct}
had the maximum time to growth, with
incubation time \theinct,
incubation temperature \theincT\ and
time to growth, \themaxgrowth.

Saving Entries

Entries can be saved using the command:

\csvSaveEntry[counter]{identifier}[empty text]

where counter is a LaTeX counter, by default csvrownumber, and identifier is the header entry. The entry can then be used with the command:

\csvGetEntry{counter}{identifier}

The final optional argument empty text to \csvSaveEntry is the text to use if the entry is blank. For example, \csvSaveEntry{Time}[MISSING DATA] will print MISSING DATA if the Time field is blank.

The following example illustrates the use of these commands.

Example 14 (Saving Entries)

This example illustrates how you can use one CSV file to access data in other CSV files. This example has several CSV files:

File index.csv:
File,Temperature,NaCl,pH
exp25a.csv,25,4.7,0.5
exp25b.csv,25,4.8,1.5
exp30a.csv,30,5.12,4.5
File exp25a.csv:
Time,Logcount
0,3.75
23,3.9
45,4.0
File exp25b.csv:
Time,Logcount
0,3.6
60,3.8
120,4.0
File exp30a.csv:
Time,Logcount
0,3.73
23,3.67
60,4.9

It is not possible to nest \CSVtotabular, \CSVtolongtable and \applyCSVfile, so if you need to go through index.csv and use each file named in there, you can first go through index.csv storing the information using \csvSaveEntry as follows:

\newcounter{maxexperiments}
\applyCSVfile{sample5.csv}{%
\stepcounter{maxexperiments}
\csvSaveEntry{File}
\csvSaveEntry{Temperature}
\csvSaveEntry{NaCl}
\csvSaveEntry{pH}
}
The counter maxexperiments simply counts the number of entries in index.csv. The entries can now be used to generate a table for each file listed in index.csv (the \whiledo command is defined in the ifthen package):
\newcounter{experiment}
\whiledo{\value{experiment}<\value{maxexperiments}}{%
\stepcounter{experiment}
\begin{table}
\caption{Temperature = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{Temperature},
NaCl = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{NaCl},
pH = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{pH}}
\vspace{10pt}
\centering
\CSVtotabular{\csvGetEntry{experiment}{File}}{ll}{%
Time & Log Count\\}{%
\insertTime & \insertLogcount\\}{%
\insertTime & \insertLogcount}

\end{table}
}
Note that \csvGetEntry needs to be \protected within the \caption command.

This example can be modified if, say, you only want the tables where the temperature is 25:

\setcounter{experiment}{0}
\whiledo{\value{experiment}<\value{maxexperiments}}{%
\stepcounter{experiment}
\ifthenelse{\equal{\csvGetEntry{experiment}{Temperature}}{25}}{%
\begin{table}
\caption{Temperature = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{Temperature},
NaCl = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{NaCl},
pH = \protect\csvGetEntry{experiment}{pH}}
\vspace{10pt}
\centering
\CSVtotabular{\csvGetEntry{experiment}{File}}{ll}{%
Time & Log Count\\}{%
\insertTime & \insertLogcount\\}{%
\insertTime & \insertLogcount}\par
\end{table}}{}
}

Pie Charts (csvpie.sty)

If you want to create a pie chart from data stored in a CSV file, you can use the csvpie package, distributed with the csvtools package. A basic pie chart can be created using the command:

\csvpiechart[options]{variable}{filename}

where filename is the name of the CSV file containing the data, and variable is the command indicating the entry that contains the value for the given segment. The starred version of \csvpiechart should be used if the CSV file has no header row.

The pie charts have ``inner'' labels on the segment, and ``outer'' labels outside the chart. The labels are given by the commands \csvpieinnerlabel and \csvpieouterlabel. The default definitions are:

\newcommand{\csvpieouterlabel}{\field{1}}
\newcommand{\csvpieinnerlabel}{\field{2}\%}
This assumes that the second column contains the data, and the first column contains a description, but can be redefined as necessary.

The pie chart display can be modified using the optional argument to \csvpiechart. This argument should be a key=value list. The available keys are as follows:

start
This should be an integer specifying the starting angle of the first segment. This is 0 by default.

total
This should be an integer specifying the sum of all the segment values. This is 100 by default.

radius
This should be a length specifying the radius of the pie chart. (Default: 2cm)

inner
This should be a fraction specifying the relative distance along the radius to start the inner label. (Default: 0.25)

outer
This should be a fraction specifying the relative distance along the radius to start the outer label. (Default: 1.25)

cutaway
This should be a comma-separated list of numbers corresponding to the segments that should be cut away from the rest of the pie chart. Since the value may contain commas, the value should always be enclosed in braces. Ranges may also be used. If a range is used, all the segments in the given range are kept together, so, for example, cutaway={1,2} will separate the first two segments from the pie chart, and the two segments will also be separated from each other, whereas cutaway={1-2} will separate the first two segments from the pie chart, but will keep the two segments together.

offset
This should be a fraction specifying the relative distance along the radius to shift the cut away segments. (Default: 0.1)

firstrow
This should be the number of the first row containing the actual data. This is equivalent to the optional argument of \applyCSVfile or \applyCSVfile*.

Note that TEX performs integer arithmetic. Although the CSV file may contain decimal numbers, rounding will occur when constructing the pie charts.

The colours for the pie chart segments can be set using the command:

\csvpiesegmentcol{n}{colour}

where n is the segment number, and colour is a defined colour name. For example, if you want the first segment in the pie chart to be yellow, do:

\csvpiesegmentcol{1}{yellow}
There are 8 predefined segment colours, if your pie chart has more than 8 segments, you will need to specify the remainder.

You can obtain the colour name for a given segment using:

\csvpiesegcolname{n}

where n is the segment number. The \csvpiechart command uses \applyCSVfile, so the csvrownumber counter can be used. This means that you can change the text colour of the outer label to match the segment. For example:

\renewcommand{\csvpieouterlabel}{%
\color{\csvpiesegcolname{\value{csvrownumber}}}\field{2}}
Note that \value must be used since n has to be a number.

If you want grey pie charts, either use the monochrome package option:

\usepackage[monochrome]{csvpie}
or use the command \colorpiechartfalse prior to using \csvpiechart. To switch back to colour pie charts, use \colorpiecharttrue.

Example 15 (A Pie Chart)

Given a CSV file (called fruit.csv) containing:
Name,Value
Apples,20
Pears,15
"lemons,limes",30.5
Peaches,24.5
Cherries,10
Then the value for each segment is given by the second column, so variable should be \field{2} or \insertValue. The following code creates a figure containing two pie charts from the above data (for an image, see the PDF version of the manual, csvtools.pdf):
 % Change the way the labels are displayed
\renewcommand{\csvpieinnerlabel}{\sffamily\insertValue\%}
\renewcommand{\csvpieoutlabel}{%
\color{\csvpiesegcolname{\value{csvrownumber}}}\sffamily\insertName}

\begin{figure}
\begin{center}
\begin{tabular}{cc}
\csvpiechart[start=45,cutaway={1,2}]{\insertValue}{fruit.csv} &
\csvpiechart[start=45,cutaway={1-2}]{\insertValue}{fruit.csv} \\
(a) & (b)
\end{tabular}
\end{center}
\caption{Pie Chart Example (a) cutaway=\{1,2\} (b) cutaway=\{1-2\}}
\end{figure}
The inner and outer labels have been redefined to use a sans-serif font, and the outer label is in the same colour as its corresponding segment. Both pie charts have a starting angle of 45 degrees, and they have the first two segments cutaway, but in (a) the first two segments are separated from each other, whereas in (b), the first two segments are joined, although separated from the rest of the pie chart.

If the CSV file has no header row, the starred version should be used, e.g.:

\csvpiechart*[cutaway={1-2}]{\field{2}}{fruit.csv}

Sorting Data (csvsort.sty)

The csvsort package (which forms part of the csvtools bundle) provides analogous commands to those provided by csvtools, but the data is first sorted. The csvsort package needs to be loaded separately in order to access the necessary commands. The package options should be a list of key=value pairs, where the available keys are:

verbose
Verbose mode. This is a boolean key. If set, the comparisons performed by the insertion sort code are printed to the screen. (Default: verbose=true.)

sort
This key specifies how to sort the data. It may take one of the following values: (Default: sort=alphabetical ascending)

variable
The sort variable. (Default: sort=\field{1})

sfirstdataline
The line on which the data starts in a data file without a header row. (Default: sfirstdataline=1.)

firstdataline
The line on which the data starts in a data file with a header row. (Default: firstdataline=2.)

Note that the csvsort package requires Éamonn McManus' compare.tex file. The csvsort package uses an insertion sort method to sort the data, so large amounts of data may slow processing time. The following commands are provided by csvsort:

\sortapplyCSVfileoptionsfilenametext

\sortapplyCSVfile*optionsfilenametext

These commands are analogous to \applyCSVfile and \applyCSVfile*, except that the data is first sorted. The optional argument is a key=value list. The keys are the same as those used in the package options, described above. These options only apply to the given instance of the command, whereas the package options apply to all csvsort commands, unless overridden in options. Example, suppose you have a file called unsorted.csv which looks like:

First Name,Surname,Age
Zephram,Lang,60
Fred,Lang,10
Barney,Langley,25
Jane,Brown,5
Adam,Smith,24
Bert,Jones,18
Then
\sortapplyCSVfile[sort=alphabetical,variable=\insertSurname]{unsorted.csv}{%
\insertSurname, \insertbyname{First Name}. Age: \insertAge\par}
will produce the following output:

Brown, Jane. Age:5

Jones, Bart. Age:18

Lang, Zephram. Age:60

Lang, Fred. Age:10

Langley, Barney. Age:25

Smith, Adam. Age: 24

Note that the data has only been sorted according to the surname. To sort first by surname, then by first name, you can do something like:

\sortapplyCSVfile[sort=alphabetical,
variable={\insertSurname,\insertbyname{First Name}}]{unsorted.csv}{%
\insertSurname, \insertbyname{First Name}. Age: \insertAge\par}
As with \applyCSVfile, you must use \field if you use the starred version:
\sortapplyCSVfile*[sort=alphabetical,
variable={\field{2},\field{1}}]{unsorted.csv}{%
\field{2}, \field{1}. Age: \field{3}\par}

The commands:

\sortCSVtotabularoptionsfilenamecol-specfirst rowall but last rowlast row
\sortCSVtolongtableoptionsfilenamecol-specfirst rowall but last rowlast row
Are analogous to \CSVtotabular and \CSVtolongtable, where, again, options is a list of key=value pairs, the same as \sortapplyCSVfile. Using the same example data as above, the following command will sort the data according to age (in numerical order) and place in a tabular environment:

\sortCSVtotabular[sort=numerical,variable=\insertAge]{unsorted.csv}{llr}{%
\bfseries Surname & \bfseries First Name & \bfseries Age\\}{%
\insertSurname & \insertbyname{First Name} & \insertAge\\}{%
\insertSurname & \insertbyname{First Name} & \insertAge}

Note that the counter csvlinenum has no meaning in the commands provided by the csvsort package. The csvrownumber counter corresponds to the sorted data row.

The csvtools.pl Perl Script

Suppose you have several large CSV files, and you have included the information into your document using \applyCSVfile, \CSVtolongtable, \CSVtotabular or \csvpiechart, which has made life so much easier for you, but you are now required by a journal to submit your source code in a single .tex file. They don't want all your CSV files, so what do you do? If you have Perl installed on your system you can use the csvtools.pl Perl script. This has the following syntax:

csvtools.pl in-file out-file

where in-file is the name of your file that contains the \applyCSVfile, \CSVtotabular etc commands, and out-file is a new file which will be created by csvtools.pl. This new file will be the same as in-file except that all occurances of \applyCSVfile, \CSVtolongtable, \CSVtotabular and \csvpiechart will be replaced by the relevant data extracted from the named CSV files.

Example 16 (csvtools.pl -- Aligning Data)

Suppose the file mydoc.tex contains the code given in Example 4, with the associated CSV file sample.csv also given in that example. Then if you do:
csvtools.pl mydoc.tex mydocnew.tex
the file mydocnew.tex will be created which will be identical to mydoc.tex except the lines containing the code \CSVtotabular{sample.csv}{lccc}{...}{...}{...} will be replaced with the lines:
 % \CSVtotabular{sample.csv}... converted using csvtools.pl
 %>> START INSERT
 \begin{tabular}{lccc}
 \bfseries Name &
 \bfseries Assignment 1 &
 \bfseries Assignment 2 &
 \bfseries Total\\
 A. Smith&80&70&150\\
 B. Jones&60&80&140\\
 J. Doe&85&75&160\\
  &75&75&150
 \end{tabular}%<< END INSERT

Similarly, csvtools.pl will substitute all occurrances of \CSVtolongtable, \applyCSVfile and \csvpiechart.

Notes

  1. If perl is located in a directory other than /usr/bin/ you will need to edit the first line of csvtools.pl as appropriate. You can find the location using the command:
    which perl
    

  2. If you can't directly execute a Perl script, you can do:

    perl csvtools.pl in-file out-file

  3. You must first LaTeX your document before using csvtools.pl as it checks the log file for any counters that have been defined.

  4. csvtools.pl only knows about a very limited set of LaTeX commands. It should be able to understand:
    \CSVtotabular{\csvGetEntry{experiment}{File}}{ll}{...
    
    (see Example 14), but it won't be able to understand, say,
    \newcommand{\filename}{\csvGetEntry{experiment}{File}}
    \CSVtotabular{\filename}{ll}{...
    
    It can pick up on \addtocounter, \stepcounter, \refstepcounter and \setcounter but only if they are used explicitly in the named .tex file. (It ignores any files that have been included using \input, \include etc.)

  5. This Perl script has only been tested under Linux, but it ought to work under other systems.


Bugs/Drawbacks/``Features''

  1. The package doesn't check to see whether \insertidentifier exists, otherwise you would not be able to use multiple CSV files with the same headers, as in Example 14. Therefore it is recommended that you check to make sure that the command does not already exist. For example, the TEX commands \insert and \insertpenalties already exist, so a blank header or a header named penalties would cause problems. (These two will now cause an error as from version 1.1, but it's something bear in mind.)

  2. Note also that \insertbyname doesn't check if you've given a valid label, so if no text appears, check you've spelt it correctly, checking punctuation, spaces and case.

  3. Note that in Example 2, replacing line 3 with:
    \centerline{\includegraphics{\insertbyname{File}}}
    
    will cause an error, as \insertbyname{File} doesn't get fully expanded by the time it gets passed to \includegraphics, and will prevent \includegraphics from finding the file. It is possible to get around this using TEX's \edef command:
    \edef\psfilename{\insertbyname{File}}
    \centerline{\includegraphics{\psfilename}}
    

  4. You can't have commands like \hline, \cline and \multicolumn in the first column of the middle or last code of \CSVtotabular or \CSVtolongtable. If you do, it will generate a misplaced \noalign error, instead you need to put it at the end of the first or middle code. (See Example 6.)

  5. You can't have nested \applyCSVfile, \CSVtolongtable and \CSVtotabular commands. Nor can you have \csvpiechart within one of these commands (See Example 14)

  6. If the CSV file has a header row, it must be on the first line.

  7. It is possible for TEX to run out of memory if you use \csvSaveEntry on a large file.

  8. In version 1.0, there was an inconsistency with csvrownumber within \applyCSVfile and \CSVtotabular. In the former it excluded the header row, whereas the latter included it. This has been changed in version 1.1 so that within \applyCSVfile, \CSVtotabular and \CSVtolongtable, csvrownumber refers to the data row (excluding header row.) I hope this doesn't cause problems, but it makes more sense that they should be consistent. So if you have no blank lines in your CSV file, csvrownumber should always be 1 more than csvlinenumber.

Contact Details

Dr Nicola Talbot
School of Computing Sciences
University of East Anglia
Norwich. NR4 7TJ. England.

http://theoval.cmp.uea.ac.uk/~nlct/



Footnotes

...identifier1
See Note 1 in Section 11
... file2
Remeber to use a letter type of class file
... file3
The graphics or graphicx package will be needed.
...tab:ex14
Note that \CSVtotabular only puts the data in a tabular environment not in a table
...\ifnextrowlast5
See Note 4 in Section 11
... table6
This is designed as an example of how to use the package, not incouragement to produce garish tables!


Nicola L. C. Talbot. School of Computing Sciences. University of East Anglia. Last Modified: 2007-06-26
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